Morning walk photos

Yay for Spring!

I took these photos on my way to work this morning with my iPad 2.

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New Collage – the Withering Glance

New Collage - the Withering Glance

This is a new collage I made today. I love the devastating look the woman in the pink coat has. I used her for my glamorous wallflower collage, which is another one of my favorites.

This is one of my first digital collages….sometimes it’s just easier to have a pair of scissors.

Cute store display featuring salvaged wood and windows

The Anthropologie store in downtown Boise has the best store displays. I took these photos last summer and wanted to share them with you (so I could share them on Pinterest.) The store display guru took salvaged wood and windows and created a small house within the store. I just love it–if my future screened in porch could look half as cool I would be delighted.

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Here is a cute tablescape from the same visit.

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Art Deco Necklaces

I am loving the great new Bead Landing jewelry findings from Michael’s! It seems they are always introducing new fun product lines it makes it fun to design for the new bling. Using the Art Deco rhinestone pendants, before Christmas, I created a necklace with rose and cream colored glass pearls rhinestone rhondeles, pieces of the coordinating Art Deco chain and my grandmother’s old wristwatch. Inspired by the Art Deco design, I named it the Gatsby necklace. This necklace has a happy new home in Ireland, thanks to Etsy’s international reach.

Since there were two pendants in the pack, this left me with another pendant to incorporate into a necklace. This time, I used peacock blue glass pearls and cream pearls to accent the Art Deco pendant. I loved the original Gatsby with the shiny rhinestone rhondeles and most of all, for the inclusion of Grandma Lorraine’s watch, but I love this one too. With the classic drop pearl pendant, it reminds me of some of the fantastic pearl necklaces of the Elizabethan times, but remixed with an Art Deco flair.

This is the link to the necklace on Etsy.

Kitchen Rehab

I have a teeny tiny kitchen, but it has recently been made more efficient by my industrious father and mother.

The previous owners replaced some of the cabinets and counters, however the counters were still inefficient. The kitchen is set up with the fridge, stove and a tiny cabinet/counter on the wall that leads to the living room. There is a small built-in sideboard with cabinets on the bottom, a 13″ deep worksurface, and large cabinets above. The sink is on an island that has two lower cabinets and a dishwasher. This separates the cooking area with a small area for the table & chairs. Since this is a vintage kitchen, my vintage table & chairs fit perfectly in this small space.

With such limited space, the main worksurface is the counter area on the two sides next to the sink. The previous sink was nice, but HUGE. Not only was it wide, but it was also deep. It took up a considerable amount of space, and its size meant that many many dishes could be stored there–instead of in the dishwasher, which left the kitchen looking messy….this is the sink’s fault, not the messy homeowner.

The previous owner spent considerable time and effort to create wooden molding to surround the counters. These were then painted white to contrast the dark granite-colored formica. So, you have already small counters made even smaller with 2 1/2″ painted molding surrounding the edges. Not only was the painted surface impossible to keep clean, but the caulking between the molding and the formica was also a trap for dirt and germs. In addition, the counter island did not have a backsplash, so anyone sitting with their back to the sink was in danger of getting sprayed.

My father suggested using a pre-fab counter with built-in backsplash to replace the tired counter. He started by removing the molding from the counter, as seen in this picture.

This photo also shows how large the original sink was. It was a very nice Kohler sink, but it would look nicer in a much larger kitchen. The new sink is a much smaller, more shallow, stainless steel sink. The entire counter feels like one continuous work surface. Plus, the backsplash creates a separation from the table area.

The back of the counter (the side facing the table area) was previously¬† painted to match the wall color. It looked…fine…but didn’t look polished or particularly finished.

For the new counter, using cabinet doors we purchased for $10 at a yard sale, the back is finished and painted white for a beautiful built-in look.

The counter beside the stove was replaced with a granite tile surrounded by elegant stained wood. It is a great surface right next to the stove for hot pots and prep work.

Here is the final look of the kitchen, with the new pendant light I installed over the kitchen table.

As you can see, my kitchen is still tiny, but it works more efficiently with the new counter. It is amazing how much more efficient my kitchen is with minor changes. It didn’t need a huge kitchen remodel to make a significant difference to my house.

Work in Progress – Play Program

I have been super busy working on a program for an upcoming production of both Hamlet and Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead. Both productions are being presented in rotating repertory so the program will be a combination of both productions.

The concept is of a workbook of the production with bits and pieces falling out of a well worn book. Using my well-known love of paper ephemera and my vast collection, I have managed to bring in a little CarrieTown to my day-job. I will post more as it gets closer to completion, but here is a sneak peak of the cover.

Since the program book covers both productions, it will Hamlet on one side, and then will be flipped over to the R&G side.

The notebook graphics were created in PhotoShop using various leather patterns with additional aging accomplished with grunge brushes. This photo includes the bleeds, but you can see from the distressing where the final size will be trimmed.

I have had so much fun creating all the individual elements of this program. I am excited to see how it turns out.

Random Kitchen Stuff

This is the current state of the vintage fabric collage I made for my kitchen. It’s not quite there yet, but I don’t know what else it needs, so I am going to live with it for a while until I figure out the next steps. The photo isn’t the best, it was taken with the iPad, rather than my usual camera.

I love the way the vintage fabric colors pop on the white background. The color copy was so good it even picked up some stains on the tablecloth. I think I will be using this pattern in many more future projects….not for the stain, but for the vibrant colors.

I installed this brushed nickel warehouse light above my kitchen table. It took three times as long as it should, because I didn’t have a helper. I couldn’t hold the light and connect the wires, so I had to pile a bunch of stuff on the table so I could rest the shade on top while I shortened the cord.

This light replaces one of those bog-standard ceiling lights that come four to a pack at Home Depot. I like the intimate lighting of a pendant over the table. I will post a pic of the rest of the kitchen changes in a future post.

Making Color Copies of Vintage Fabric

My parents have been helping me with a small kitchen remodeling project. I haven’t done much to assist, so I decided to do what I could to help. Namely, create new artwork for the wall. I know, big help.

Inspired by my 1950’s turquoise formica metal table & vinyl chairs, my kitchen is pale green with bright red cherry accents. I want to incorporate these colors along with a 1950’s vibe in a large collage on canvas.

I started by taking a few pieces of vintage fabric (tablecloths, napkins) to the local copy center, and making large 11 x 17″ color copies of the fabric. It looked pretty silly to have the large barkcloth tablecloth completely covering the copier, but the results were worth any embarrassment! The colors perfectly match the vibrant colors of the fabric–plus you don’t have to destroy the original source material to create something new.

Check out the results: